The Mildred S. Dresselhaus Lecture Series

The Dresselhaus Lecture series is named in honor of Mildred "Millie" Dresselhaus, a beloved MIT professor whose research helped unlock the mysteries of carbon, the most fundamental of organic elements—earning her the nickname “queen of carbon science.” This annual event recognizes a significant figure in science and engineering from anywhere in the world whose leadership and impact echo Millie’s life, accomplishments, and values.

PREVIOUS DRESSELHAUS LECTURERS

Jelena VučkovićNovember 15, 2021
Inverse designed photonics: Are computers better than humans in designing photonics?

Jelena Vučković
Jensen Huang Professor in Global Leadership in the School of Engineering
Professor of Electrical Engineering, and by courtesy of Applied Physics
Stanford University

Read a recap of Jelena Vučković's lecture on MIT News.
Watch the video on MIT.nano's YouTube Channel.


Evelyn HuNovember 16, 2020
Transforming defects into opportunities: Leveraging the nanoscale

Evelyn Hu
Tarr-Coyne Professor of Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering
John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard University

Read a recap of Evelyn Hu's lecture on MIT News.
Watch the video on MIT.nano's YouTube channel.


Paul McEuenNovember 13, 2019
Cell-sized sensors and robots

Paul McEuen
John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science
Director of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science
Cornell University

Read a recap of Professor McEuen's lecture on MIT News
Watch the video of Paul McEuen's lecture

 

Read more about the previous Dresselhaus lecturers and watch their talk videos.


About Mildred S. Dresselhaus

Mildred DresselhausMildred "Millie" Dresselhaus was a beloved MIT professor whose research helped unlock the mysteries of carbon, the most fundamental of organic elements—earning her the nickname “queen of carbon science.” She is well-known for her work with graphene, fullerenes (also known as "buckyballs"), bismuth nanowires, and low dimensional thermoelectricity. She developed the concept of the "nanotube," a single-layer sheet of carbon atoms that is incredibly thin and yet incredibly strong.

With appointments in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Physics, Dresselhaus was a member of the MIT faculty for 50 years. In 1985 she was honored with the title of Institute Professor, an esteemed position held by no more than 12 MIT professors at one time. A winner of numerous awards, Dresselhaus was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the National Medal of Science, and the Kavli Prize in Nanoscience. She was inducted into the U.S. National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014.

Dresselhaus led MIT and her field not only through her research and teaching, but with her longstanding commitment to promoting gender equity in science and engineering and a dedication to mentorship and teaching. She received a Carnegie Foundation grant in 1973 to support her efforts to encourage women to enter traditionally male dominated fields of science and engineering.

In honor of Millie, MIT.nano will host the Mildred S. Dresselhaus Lecture annually in November, the month of Millie's birthday. The event will recognize a significant figure in science and engineering from anywhere in the world whose leadership and impact echo Millie’s life, accomplishments, and values.

Questions?

Contact MIT.nano.